Financial things to do (and not to do) in your 30’s

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The 30’s are definitely an interesting decade. Chances are they are a mixed bag for most people in them, including myself: wedding, kids, house, career…etc. This decade is probably the most taxing on hard-earned dollars.

The good news is that your 30’s are also your top-earning decade. Without further ado, here is what you should – and shouldn’t- be doing in your 30’s:

  • become established in your career. You probably have a few years of experience under your belt by now. Make the most of them to negotiate your salary and promotion or to find a better job. If you are considering a career change or want to become self-employed, you will need to plan for this. Keep reading.
  • make use of work benefits: benefits are basically free-money, and even more so when they are employer-paid. If your employer offers extended health and/or disability insurance, please enroll. Same goes for a pension or a group RRSP plan.
  • track your expenses and income. There is no way you can budget and set goals if you don’t do this.
  • have a sufficient emergency fund. Whether you want to call it a back-up fund or an opportunity fund, it is all the same. It needs to be adequately funded. Chances are $ 1 000 are not going to cut it anymore, particularly if you have dependents. Most people aim for 3 to 6 months of living expenses. Aim for what is right for you, given your circumstances.
  • have adequate insurance coverage. Unless you are loaded with cash you need insurance. Check my previous entry on this subject.
  • plan and save for items: whether it is car repairs, your wedding or your annual vacation, these are neither emergency nor a surprise. If you are unable to save the money, then you may have to postpone or consider other options.
  • don’t keep-up with Joneses. You should be way past this.
  • you are really saving for your retirement. This should be the top-priority, before your kids’ education, if you have them. Ultimately, your children won’t pay for your retirement.
  • you are investing in the stock market. You still have a few decades before retiring. The stock market has always provided the highest returns. Educate yourself and invest your money. Do not let it sit in your savings account earning 0.5% interest.
  • you have your debt under control. It is unlikely you will be able to completely avoid debt in your 30’s. Your student loans should be on their way out, if not paid off. You are not racking-up credit card debt to buy stuff or to pay for living expenses. When borrowing, it should be to buy an appreciating asset, when the cost of the loan does not impact other saving goals and will be paid off before retirement. Anything not under that category should be off-limit.
  • Don’t buy too much house. If you decide that home ownership is for you, do not become cash poor over it. Too many Canadians make their home their entire financial plan, including to retire. This is a mistake. You also need highly-liquid, easily disposable assets.
  • have your legal affairs in order. You need a will, even more so if you are married and/or with children. Ensure you designate a beneficiary for your life insurance and other registered accounts.

 

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